CBG is found in cannabis. It is one of the most common cannabinoid compounds found in the plant, THC, and CBD. The two most common ways to consume CBG are through infusions and topicals. However, if one wants to get more technical, several forms of orally consuming CBG are capsules, edibles, tinctures, etc.

These forms are technically considered consumption, but they are broken down into different types, namely:

Capsules or Edibles

Capsules or edibles containing purified CBG are probably the safest way to ingest it orally since you do not have any other cannabinoids mixed in, making it easy to control the dose. It would be recommended to use a capsule rather than an edible because the digestive system will significantly break down CBG compared to stomach or intestinal administration, making it harder to measure accurate dosages.

An effective dose of pure CBG, when taken orally, is about 5 mg once or twice per day, depending on how much one can tolerate. This amount often results in mild effects for most people. A starting dose can be as low as 1mg and gradually increase every few days until desired effects are achieved.

Topicals for Skin Conditions

Topical preparations containing CBG have been used for treating skin conditions such as acne, psoriasis, and eczema. Broad spectrum CBG is an antibacterial agent against Propionibacterium acnes (P. Acnes), one of the main bacterial causes of acne vulgaris.

Sublingual Consumption

A sublingual dose of purified CBG would be about 5-10mg, depending on how much one can tolerate it for their body type. It would probably take around 30-90 minutes to feel any effects since this method introduces the compound into the bloodstream through absorption under the tongue rather than digestion like most others.

CBG or Cannabigerol is a non-psychotropic cannabinoid found in the Cannabis genus of plants. CBG has been shown to offer benefits such as acting as an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and even helping stimulate bone growth.

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